The Orange Life of Riley

Great Flood of the Mississippi River, 1993
During the first half of 1993, the U.S. Midwest experienced unusually heavy rains. Much of the United States in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River drainage basin received more than 1.5 times their average rainfall in the first six months of the year, and parts of North Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas experienced more than double. The rains often arrived in very intense storms. Floods overwhelmed the elaborate system of dykes and other water control structures in the Mississippi River basin, leading to the greatest flood ever recorded on the Upper Mississippi. In St. Louis, the Mississippi remained above flood stage for 144 days between April 1 and September 30, 1993.
This image pair shows the area around St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1991 and 1993. The 1993 image was captured slightly after the peak water levels in this part of the Mississippi River. Flood waters had started to recede, but remained well above normal. This false-color image was created by combining infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths of light observed by the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument onboard the Landsat 5 satellite (TM bands 5, 4, and 2 respectively). Water appears dark blue, healthy vegetation is green, bare fields and freshly exposed soil are pink, and concrete is grey. The scale of flooding in the river basins of the Illinois, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers in 1993 is immense. The deep pink scars in the 1993 image show where flood waters have drawn back to reveal the scoured land.
Other factors contributed to the severity of the flooding that year. The previous year had been cooler than average, which decreased evaporation from the soil and allowed the heavy rains to saturate the ground rapidly. In addition, widespread landcover change along rivers and streams has dramatically altered the natural flood control systems: wetlands that can absorb large amounts of water and release it slowly over time. The network of levees, canals, and dams in the Upper Mississippi Basin was unable to control the floods of 1993.
Spurred by this massive disaster, geologist Robert Brackenridge of Dartmouth College brought the tools of satellite remote sensing to bear on the issue of flood management, prediction, and monitoring. You can read about his work in the feature article High Water: Building A Global Flood Atlas.
NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat Project Science Office.
Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

Great Flood of the Mississippi River, 1993

During the first half of 1993, the U.S. Midwest experienced unusually heavy rains. Much of the United States in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River drainage basin received more than 1.5 times their average rainfall in the first six months of the year, and parts of North Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas experienced more than double. The rains often arrived in very intense storms. Floods overwhelmed the elaborate system of dykes and other water control structures in the Mississippi River basin, leading to the greatest flood ever recorded on the Upper Mississippi. In St. Louis, the Mississippi remained above flood stage for 144 days between April 1 and September 30, 1993.

This image pair shows the area around St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1991 and 1993. The 1993 image was captured slightly after the peak water levels in this part of the Mississippi River. Flood waters had started to recede, but remained well above normal. This false-color image was created by combining infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths of light observed by the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument onboard the Landsat 5 satellite (TM bands 5, 4, and 2 respectively). Water appears dark blue, healthy vegetation is green, bare fields and freshly exposed soil are pink, and concrete is grey. The scale of flooding in the river basins of the Illinois, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers in 1993 is immense. The deep pink scars in the 1993 image show where flood waters have drawn back to reveal the scoured land.

Other factors contributed to the severity of the flooding that year. The previous year had been cooler than average, which decreased evaporation from the soil and allowed the heavy rains to saturate the ground rapidly. In addition, widespread landcover change along rivers and streams has dramatically altered the natural flood control systems: wetlands that can absorb large amounts of water and release it slowly over time. The network of levees, canals, and dams in the Upper Mississippi Basin was unable to control the floods of 1993.

Spurred by this massive disaster, geologist Robert Brackenridge of Dartmouth College brought the tools of satellite remote sensing to bear on the issue of flood management, prediction, and monitoring. You can read about his work in the feature article High Water: Building A Global Flood Atlas.

NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat Project Science Office.

Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

ladyhistory:

ladyhistory:

I feel the need to design “1776” (the musical) themed shirts

OKAY SO I’M ACTUALLY GOING TO DO THIS SOMETIME THIS WEEK OR WEEKEND WHEN SCHOOL ISN’T BUSY

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Australian Photoset #17

Want to see more?

Canadian Photoset #16

Pentatonix: LaLaLatch

eradicatedelicacy:

Shakira, Shakira.

eradicatedelicacy:

Shakira, Shakira.

callurn:

Looks like Hulk skipped leg day

callurn:

Looks like Hulk skipped leg day

catlover839:

archgayngel:

captain-irrayditation:

irrhythmic:

captchaloginbreadcrumbs:

[INTERNAL SCREAMING]

this is not ok

telling time just got 300% more confusing

aesthetically interesting, cognitively nightmarish

Teacher: What’s the time?

Me: *Mental breakdown*

I figure this is what Patently’s nightmares look like. @patentlymarie

mychemgirl15:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Fun fact: the reason that people threw tomatoes at bad actors in the medieval age was because tomatoes were thought to be poisonous to humans. They aimed for the mouths because they were trying to kill them


Fro you were born in the wrong century!

mychemgirl15:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Fun fact: the reason that people threw tomatoes at bad actors in the medieval age was because tomatoes were thought to be poisonous to humans. They aimed for the mouths because they were trying to kill them

Fro you were born in the wrong century!

me: *owns 264 unread books*
me: *buys 17 new books*
me: *rereads harry potter*
strangergirls:

oy-eld-thankee:

I love how the other one is like “whoop, heres my ride”

Get in, loser, we’re going mopping

strangergirls:

oy-eld-thankee:

I love how the other one is like “whoop, heres my ride”

Get in, loser, we’re going mopping

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

suchvodka:

I HAVE BEEN SAYING THIS FOR SO LONG

suchvodka:

I HAVE BEEN SAYING THIS FOR SO LONG

mutuallydestructive:

gallifrey-feels:

earthgirldonna:

feferipixies:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

everythingis19:

cosmicsyzygy:

Look, I made a gif of this most awesome wizard at the Leaky Cauldron!

DUDE IS READING ‘A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME’ BY STEPHEN HAWKING
I NEVER REALIZED

are you serious
I always assumed wizards just ignored science, because the fact that “magic” exists, can explain anything. But there are MuggleBorn wizards, ones who, until they were eleven, lived in the real world and learned science and things. Did they all just abandon that normal, muggle knowledge, like Harry did? It’s always been there, itching in the back of my mind.
FOUR FOR YOU SCIENCE WIZARD
YOU GO SCIENCE WIZARD

can we point out that he’s doing wandless magic too
like voldemort couldnt even do that shit
molly fuckin weasley couldnt fuckin do that
who are you

pretty sure this whole series has been about the wrong wizard guys

Plot Twist: He is able to do wandless magic because his comprehensive understanding of quantum physics means that he is the only wizard/witch to actually understand how magic works.

I want seven books about him

mutuallydestructive:

gallifrey-feels:

earthgirldonna:

feferipixies:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

everythingis19:

cosmicsyzygy:

Look, I made a gif of this most awesome wizard at the Leaky Cauldron!

DUDE IS READING ‘A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME’ BY STEPHEN HAWKING

I NEVER REALIZED

are you serious

I always assumed wizards just ignored science, because the fact that “magic” exists, can explain anything. But there are MuggleBorn wizards, ones who, until they were eleven, lived in the real world and learned science and things. Did they all just abandon that normal, muggle knowledge, like Harry did? It’s always been there, itching in the back of my mind.

FOUR FOR YOU SCIENCE WIZARD

YOU GO SCIENCE WIZARD

can we point out that he’s doing wandless magic too

like voldemort couldnt even do that shit

molly fuckin weasley couldnt fuckin do that

who are you

pretty sure this whole series has been about the wrong wizard guys

Plot Twist: He is able to do wandless magic because his comprehensive understanding of quantum physics means that he is the only wizard/witch to actually understand how magic works.

I want seven books about him

Elephant play “Hula Hoop”

I’m pretty sure this is what all of my rhythmic gymnastic routines looked like.